REPLICA




When produced faithfully, a replica or forgery is near indistinguishable from an original work. We are all familiar with tales of elusive art forgers working from the shadows to create paintings or sculptures so true as to leave the most discerning of experts non the wiser. From the designers perspective however, the act of replication provides a more noble avenue of possibilities. Engaging in various methods of replication, Studio Furthermore have turned the notion of replica on its head. 



The studio have developed original replication methods that they refer to as 'lost foam' processes working with both ceramic and aluminium alloy materials. Designs are carefully handcrafted out of an ubiquitous foam material; each of these items constitutes an 'original'. During the lost foam ceramic process, a foam original burns away inside a kiln leaving behind a one of a kind terracotta foam REPLICA. For the lost foam alloy process, a foam original is entombed in sand. Molten alloy is poured onto the foam original which in turn vaporizes leaving behind a metallic REPLICA. In each case an original work is sacrificed and what remains is a REPLICA.



Developing this body of work, Studio Furthermore searched for inspiration in the rocks, clays and mineral ores which resembled some of their material experiments in terracotta and aluminium. A parallel could be drawn between the material characteristics of rock formations and various studio samples. Seeking cues from nature, Studio Furthermore headed far north to the shores of Iceland, a place laded with geological processes observable in constantly shifting landscapes. Foamy lava rocks and cooled magma debris decorate an alien landscape of volcanoes, geysers and icebergs. Tephra hued soils rich in minerals lay bare the otherwise obscured processes that create them. This young land, still in its primordial phase, perpetually forms and reforms via it's rock cycles. Energy and matter releasing from within the earth cool in varying conditions to produce a wide spectrum of rock materials. Silent and inanimate, rocks are themselves a curiosity since they express little but that of the processes to which they owe their formation.